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    One in three children believe cheese comes from plants - shocking survey results revealed

    NewsTuesday 15 July 2014
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    A survey has been carried out recently to see how much school children know about farming and the results have been rather worrying. 
     
    Nearly half of the 2,000 primary school children who were surveyed have never visited a working farm and astonishingly one in 25 believes that farmers ‘grow mud’, according to the Daily Mail
     
    The poll revealed widespread ignorance among the children when it comes to the countryside and the origins of the food that they ate. 
     
    The children who were surveyed were between the ages of seven and eleven and the poll suggested that the children’s lack of understanding was affecting their eating habits. 
     
    Experts say that an awareness of the origins of food is a good way to combat obesity among children and help to encourage them to eat healthily. 
     
    The national programme that involves weighing and measuring primary school children released figures that have shown that 14.4 per cent of primary school children are overweight. 
     
    Among the children who are aged four and five, 9.3 per cent are classified as obese with a further 13 per cent being labelled overweight. 
     
    When it comes to the awareness of these children some of the figures and stats were quite alarming. Of the children questioned in the poll: 
     
    • One in six are unaware that vegetables are grown on farms
    • One in 50 pupils believe that farmers harvest potato waffles
    • One in 100 pupils think that farmers grow tractors
    • 9 per cent of the children have visited a countryside location in the last 12 months
     
    Last year the British Nutrition Foundation carried out research that revealed one in three primary pupils thought that cheese came from plants and that one in 10 believed tomatoes grew under ground. 
     
    Cereals giant Kellogg’s is funding a set of teaching aids to help teach children about the origins of food. 
     
    These teaching packs have been developed by the National Schools Partnership, and it provides the children with educational resources and also includes a short film about the ‘seed to spoon’ story of cereal. 
     
    Richard Burkinshaw, of Kellogg's, said: “It's really important children learn about the origins of their food from an early age.
     
    “That way they grow up knowing how food is made and understanding what a balanced diet consists of.”
     
     
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